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champagnecandy:

youaintpunk:


I started rapping when I was 14, when Marley Marl asked me to record ‘Roxanne’s Revenge’, a dis on U.T.F.O.’s hit ‘Roxanne, Roxanne’. We lived in the Queensbridge projects, and he promised me Sergio Valente jeans to record with him. I never got the jeans, but the song was an overnight hit. After that, I went on tour for three years as a naive child. I had a baby [now in his 20s] with a man 18 years my senior. I didn’t even have milk money for my baby, but I raised him. Today, I wonder where the adults were.
By 25, I’d quit music and enrolled at Marymount Manhattan College. I remembered a clause in my record contract that said Warner would pay for my education for life. I got a master’s from Cornell, went back to Marymount and became Dr. Roxanne Shante. I also financed Hip Hop Ices in Queens, Philadelphia and Atlanta, which are ice cream stores that hire only kids with police records. The best dish is the Roxanne— it’s Rocky Road with a chocolate topping.

Roxanne Shante

Roxanne Shante is the fucking greatest. 

champagnecandy:

youaintpunk:

I started rapping when I was 14, when Marley Marl asked me to record ‘Roxanne’s Revenge’, a dis on U.T.F.O.’s hit ‘Roxanne, Roxanne’. We lived in the Queensbridge projects, and he promised me Sergio Valente jeans to record with him. I never got the jeans, but the song was an overnight hit. After that, I went on tour for three years as a naive child. I had a baby [now in his 20s] with a man 18 years my senior. I didn’t even have milk money for my baby, but I raised him. Today, I wonder where the adults were.

By 25, I’d quit music and enrolled at Marymount Manhattan College. I remembered a clause in my record contract that said Warner would pay for my education for life. I got a master’s from Cornell, went back to Marymount and became Dr. Roxanne Shante. I also financed Hip Hop Ices in Queens, Philadelphia and Atlanta, which are ice cream stores that hire only kids with police records. The best dish is the Roxanne— it’s Rocky Road with a chocolate topping.

Roxanne Shante

Roxanne Shante is the fucking greatest. 

(via racialicious)

Chapman’s Five Emotional Love Languages:

sexreeducated:

This is a brilliant approach to love. Although written by a religious man, the approach is about relationships between people, not about faith. I highly recommend everyone to take the quiz at least once. Understanding more about yourself, your needs and your partners’ needs can only serve to improve communication and an equivalent exchange of those needs.

  • Words of Affirmation
    This is when you say how nice your spouse looks, or how great the dinner tasted. These words will also build your mate’s self image and confidence. Actions don’t always speak louder than words. If this is your love language, unsolicited compliments mean the world to you. Hearing the words, “I love you,” are important—hearing the reasons behind that love sends your spirits skyward. Insults can leave you shattered and are not easily forgotten.
  • Quality Time
    Some spouses believe that being together, doing things together and focusing in on one another is the best way to show love. If this is your partner’s love language, turn off the TV now and then and give one another some undivided attention. In the vernacular of Quality Time, nothing says, “I love you,” like full, undivided attention. Being there for this type of person is critical, but really being there—with the TV off, fork and knife down, and all chores and tasks on standby—makes your significant other feel truly special and loved. Distractions, postponed dates, or the failure to listen can be especially hurtful.
  • Receiving Gifts
    It is universal in human cultures to give gifts. They don’t have to be expensive to send a powerful message of love. Spouses who forget a birthday or anniversary or who never give gifts to someone who truly enjoys gift giving will find themselves with a spouse who feels neglected and unloved. Don’t mistake this love language for materialism; the receiver of gifts thrives on the love, thoughtfulness, and effort behind the gift. If you speak this language, the perfect gift or gesture shows that you are known, you are cared for, and you are prized above whatever was sacrificed to bring the gift to you. A missed birthday, anniversary, or a hasty, thoughtless gift would be disastrous—so would the absence of everyday gestures.
  • Acts of Service
    Discovering how you can best do something for your spouse will require time and creativity. These acts of service like need to be done with joy in order to be perceived as a gift of love. Can vacuuming the floors really be an expression of love? Absolutely! Anything you do to ease the burden of responsibilities weighing on an “Acts of Service” person will speak volumes. The words he or she most want to hear: “Let me do that for you.” Laziness, broken commitments, and making more work for them tell speakers of this language their feelings don’t matter.
  • Physical Touch
    Sometimes just stroking your spouse’s back, holding hands, or a peck on the cheek will fulfill this need. This language isn’t all about the bedroom. A person whose primary language is Physical Touch is, not surprisingly, very touchy. Hugs, pats on the back, holding hands, and thoughtful touches on the arm, shoulder, or face—they can all be ways to show excitement, concern, care, and love. Physical presence and accessibility are crucial, while neglect or abuse can be unforgivable and destructive.

Determining Your Own Love Language

Since you may be speaking what you need, you can discover your own love language by asking yourself these questions:

  • How do I express love to others?
  • What do I complain about the most?
  • What do I request most often?

Speaking in your spouse’s love language probably won’t be natural for you. Dr. Chapman says, “We’re not talking comfort. We’re talking love. Love is something we do for someone else. So often couples love one another but they aren’t connecting. They are sincere, but sincerity isn’t enough.”

Take the test here (Warning: Gender Assumptive)

(via dynastylnoire)

Black Girls Code, Inspiring Young Black Girls to Pursue Technology

thechanelmuse:

Black Girls Code is a California-based non-profit aiming to inspire black girls to pursue technology. Founded by tech enthusiast Kimberly Bryant, Black Girls Code’s mission is simple, yet necessary: “To increase the number of women of color in digital careers by empowering girls of color” to pursue STEM careers.

After pursuing her studies in Electrical Engineering and seeing a lack of African-American women in her classes and in the workplace, Bryant says she founded Black Girls Code to encourage young girls to consider these fields.

Black Girls Code is based in Oakland, but this summer the organization is offering coding workshops and tech classes for young girls across the country in Atlanta, St. Louis, Los Angeles, Detroit, and New York.

dynamicafrica:

Oduduwa, Olofin Adimula, oba and founder of the Yoruba people

Oduduwa, phonetically written as Odùduwà, and sometimes contracted as Odudua, Oòdua, is generally held among the Yoruba to be the ancestor of the crowned Yoruba kings.

Several legends concerning the origin and ancestry of Oduduwa abound in Yoruba and Benin mythology. The Yorubas believe he is the father of the Yoruba’s and progenitor of all Yoruba Oba’s and the Oba of Benin. The Benin believe that he is a Benin prince called EKALADERHAN who was banished by his father, the Ogiso of Benin. His name, the Benins claim, is derived from ‘Idoduwa”, a Benin word meaning fortune’s path, symbolizing the painful exile from his ancestral home. In support of this, they claim, Oduduwa’s son Oranmiyan later returned to Benin to rule the Empire around 1,000 AD. Oduduwa is believed to have had several sons (16 in number) who later became powerful traditional rulers of Yoruba land, most notably Alafin of Oyo, Oni of Ife, Oragun of Ila, Owa of Ilesha, Alake of Abeokuta and Osemawe of Ondo. Yoruba tradition holds that Oduduwa fled from Mecca to Ile-Ife, bringing with him the Ifa religion which was under persecution in Mecca. He established it firmly in Ile-Ife and founded the Ogboni cult to protect the ancient customs and institutions of his people. The Oduduwa shrine is still worshipped today in Ile-Ife as the cradle of Yoruba culture.

Oral history of the Oyo-Yoruba recount the coming of Oduduwa from the east, sometimes understood by Muslim sources as the “vicinity” or direction of Mecca, but more likely signifying the region of Ekiti and Okun sub-ethnics in northeastern Yorubaland/central Nigeria. A strong theory among the Yoruba is that Oduduwa came from the region of Egypt or Nubia and may have been fleeing from religious persecution or invasion, possibly coinciding with the Greek invasion and colonization of Egypt in the 4th century BCE. Oduduwa is presumed to have entered the Ekiti-Yoruba and Okun-Yoruba region. This region is near the confluence of the Niger and Benue rivers, and is where the Yoruba language is presumed to have separated from related ethno-linguistic groups like Igala, Igbo, and Edo

The Ife oral traditions, on the other hand, tell that Odùduwà was the son of the supreme god Olodumare or Olorun, and was sent by him from heaven to create the earth. (Another version of this myth ascribes these episodes to Obatala, casting Oodua, as an usurper).

Descending from the heavens via a chain let down to Ile Ife, Obatala brought with him a cockerel, a pigeon, and a calabash full of dirt. After throwing the soil upon the waters, he set the cockerel and pigeon on the pile of dirt that, in turn, scratched and scattered it around to create the rest of dry land that became the Earth’s surface.

Odùduwà  subsequently became one of the first kings of Ife, and then sent his sons out with crowns to rule over all of the other Yorùbá kingdoms, which is why all royal Yorùbá lineages claim direct descent from Odùduwà and refer to the Ooni of Ife as first among equals (popularly rendered in the Latin phrase primus inter pares in Nigeria).

Ile Ife continues to be considered the spiritual capital of the Yoruba.

(source)

post suggested by http://roseepetals.tumblr.com/

smallrevolutionary:

peaceshine3:

Because its being done to poor black/hispanic kids.
thepeoplesrecord:

Why isn’t closing 40 Philadelphia public schools national news?
In what should be the biggest story of the week, the city of Philadelphia’s school system announced Tuesday that it expects to close 40 public schools next year and 64 by 2017. The school district expects to lose 40% of current enrollment to charter schools, the streets or wherever, and put thousands of experienced, well qualified teachers, often grounded in the communities where they teach, on the street.
Ominously, the shredding of Philadelphia’s public schools isn’t even news outside Philly. This correspondent would never have known about it save for a friend’s Facebook posting early this week. Corporate media in other cities don’t mention massive school closings, whether in Chicago, Atlanta, NYC, or in this case Philadelphia, perhaps so people won’t have given the issue much deep thought before the same crisis is manufactured in their town. Even inside Philadelphia the voices of actual parents, communities, students and teachers are shut out of most newspaper and broadcast accounts.
Full article


america…..
i’m moving.

smallrevolutionary:

peaceshine3:

Because its being done to poor black/hispanic kids.

thepeoplesrecord:

Why isn’t closing 40 Philadelphia public schools national news?

In what should be the biggest story of the week, the city of Philadelphia’s school system announced Tuesday that it expects to close 40 public schools next year and 64 by 2017. The school district expects to lose 40% of current enrollment to charter schools, the streets or wherever, and put thousands of experienced, well qualified teachers, often grounded in the communities where they teach, on the street.

Ominously, the shredding of Philadelphia’s public schools isn’t even news outside Philly. This correspondent would never have known about it save for a friend’s Facebook posting early this week. Corporate media in other cities don’t mention massive school closings, whether in Chicago, Atlanta, NYC, or in this case Philadelphia, perhaps so people won’t have given the issue much deep thought before the same crisis is manufactured in their town. Even inside Philadelphia the voices of actual parents, communities, students and teachers are shut out of most newspaper and broadcast accounts.

Full article

america…..

i’m moving.

(via racialicious)

"This is a no-brainer."

- President Obama on why Congress should prevent student loan interest rates from doubling on July 1 (via barackobama)

(via ethiopienne)

boston:

Harvard, MIT in $60m online partnership 
- The universities will offer free online courses under the superbrand “edX,” making them major players in the burgeoning online education sector.
(Illustration by Serge Bloch)

boston:

Harvard, MIT in $60m online partnership

- The universities will offer free online courses under the superbrand “edX,” making them major players in the burgeoning online education sector.

(Illustration by Serge Bloch)

"For the first eight years of our marriage, [Michelle and I] were paying more in student loans than what we were paying for our mortgage. So we know what this is about.

And we were lucky to land good jobs with a steady income. But we only finished paying off our student loans—check this out, all right, I’m the President of the United States—we only finished paying off our student loans about eight years ago."

- President Obama in North Carolina today on why Congress has to act to prevent interest rates on student loans from doubling (via barackobama)

(via str8nochaser)

stprincipe:

We are the people

stprincipe:

We are the people

(via africaisdonesuffering)

thatneedstogo:

File this under things young girls should shout at least once a day?

thatneedstogo:

File this under things young girls should shout at least once a day?

(via theoceanandthesky)

dynamicafrica:

In Shona music, the mbira dzavadzimu (“voice of the ancestors”, national instrument of Zimbabwe) is a musical instrument that has been played by the Shona people of Zimbabwe for thousands of years. The mbira dzavadzimu is frequently played at religious ceremonies and social gatherings called mabira (sing. “bira”).

A typicalmbira dzavadzimuconsists of between 22 and 28 keys constructed from hot- or cold-forgedmetal affixed to a hardwoodsoundboard(gwariva) in three different registers—two on the left, one on the right.

While playing, thelittle fingerof the right hand is placed through a hole in the bottom right corner of the soundboard, stabilizing the instrument and leaving thumb and index finger of the right hand open tostrokethe keys in the right register from above and below. The fingers of the left hand stabilize the left side of the instrument, with most fingers reaching behind the instrument. Both registers on the left side of the instrument are played with the left thumb and sometimes the left forefinger.

Bottle caps,shells, or other objects (“machachara”) are often affixed to the soundboard to create a buzzing sound when the instrument is played. In a traditional setting, this sound is considered extremely important, as it is believed to attract theancestral spirits.

During a public performance, anmbira dzavadzimuis frequently placed in adeze(calabashresonator) to amplify its sound.

Thembira dza vadzimuis very significant inShonareligionandculture, considered a sacred instrument by natives. It is usually played to facilitate communication with ancestral spirits. Within the Shona tradition, the mbira may be played with paired performers in which thekushaura, the caller, leads the performed piece as thekutsinhira, the responder, “interlocks” a subsequent part.

The Ritual is known as the Bira. During these all night ceremonies, people call upon the spirits to answer questions, the variations of notes in an Mbira piece aid the participants by going into a trance in which it is said in shona culture aid the spirits in taking over the participants body.

Above: Mbira Masters of Zimbabwe Beauler Dyoko & Cosmas Magaya

Some Great African Proverbs.

howiviewafrica:

  • He who marries a real beauty is seeking trouble.  - Accra proverb, Ghana
  • Hold a true friend with both hands.  - Kanuri proverb, Nigeria
  • Rising early makes the road short.  - Wolof proverb, Senegal
  • You can not take away someone’s luck.  - Kalenjin (Kenya)
  • “He who learns, teaches.”
  • “For tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today.”
  • “If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem.”
  • “Peace is costly but it is worth the expense.”
  • “To try and to fail is not laziness.”
  • “The fool speaks, the wise man listens.”
  • “Seeing is different than being told.”
  • “You must judge a man by the work of his hands.”
  • “When the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch.”
  • “We start as fools and become wise through experience.”

(via str8nochaser)